Integrates relevant literature and resources to support and justify key ideas and observations.Paper , Order, or Assignment Requirements

Integrates relevant literature and resources to support and justify key ideas and observations.Paper , Order, or Assignment Requirements

Written Inquiry / Reflection

Task description :This task will require you to reflect upon and analyse a written or video-based healthcare scenario from an ethico-legal perspective, using Driscoll’s reflective model as a guide. It is expected that you will draw upon the unit content, personal experiences and relevant literature and learning resources to inform your reflection and analysis.

Task length :1500 words

Assessment criteria:

Demonstrates familiarity with key concepts of ethical practice (covered in the unit) pertaining to the chosen situation;

Demonstrates an understanding of the ethico-legal complexities inherent in the situation, and considers the implications of different courses of action;

Shows evidence of developing ethical awareness and how self-reflection may inform your practice and relationships with others;

Writes clearly and succinctly using Driscoll’s model (written in the first-person), with correct grammar, ethico-legal terminology and referencing (Harvard style);

Integrates relevant literature and resources to support and justify key ideas and observations.

Case Study

Assessment Task 3 – Scenario 1

You are an undergraduate nursing student at a large university and have just

started your PEP in a busy urban hospital. In your practice units (your units that

give you the practical skills you will need on PEP) your lecturer and tutor have

stressed the importance of managing sharps (needles, cannulas and the like)

correctly. Your tutor has told you on a number of occasions that after giving an

injection, you should never re-cap the needle – instead, you should place it in a

kidney dish and dispose of it directly from the dish into a designated sharps

container.

Your tutor has directed students to one of the Australian Government’s

website on the handling of sharps and when you check out the website, you

can see that one of the recommendations is that ‘needles must not be

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